Sophia lives two lives, in one she is a daughter of a well-off family, in the other she is the Red Rook, a thief who snatches people away from the Tombs and their fated deaths. To save her family, she is to marry the fop and incessant womanizer, René Hasard. However, just like herself, there is more to him than meets the eye. Both of them rely on subterfuge for their work, using their "chess pieces" to great effect, calling out the other's moves, and then confronting with their own. The truth is never revealed lightly, and trust comes slowly despite the burgeoning feelings they have for one another. The author plays with our hearts just as much as René's frustrating nature plays with Sophia's. She will need him though if she wishes to pull off her greatest, and most important, jailbreak ever. Between their relationship and the story, tension is a common companion. In this post-apocalyptic Paris, the lower and upper classes are once again divided. Greed corrupts and determines the fate of many, while a new religion based on the Goddess Fate drives the cruel LeBlanc to seek out the Rook. Their struggle with one anther stems from their opposing ideologies and the philosophical argument, determinism versus freewill. As for society, it has regressed to 18th century politics, fashion, and gender roles, while remnants of the past (our modern world) are hoarded secretly, a commodity of the powerful that is worth considerable sums. Many elements allude to The Scarlet Pimpernel or to France's actual history, however in this author's vision of Paris, part of it has sunk, acting as a physical symbol of the divisive nature of status. Between the interactions of its characters and the thrilling story, Rook grips us from its first page to its last.

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